township: Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymon Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar
township / Adrianna Ault, Tim Carpenter, Raymond Meeks, Brad Zellar

township

100.00
A careful deliberation on transience and the ultimate meaning of a way of life in the Midwest.

Standard Edition

township
20cm x 27cm
exposed spine softcover with dust jacket
86 pages, 61 tritone plates
two 4x6 tritone inserts
16 page 12cm x 20cm short story insert my brother by Brad Zellar
ISBN 9781943146109

Special Edition / Last Copies

township &
bement grain
20cm x 27cm
mill board cover with tipped in tritone image
64 pages, 31 tritone plates
ISBN 9781943146116
Available only with township as a Special Edition; both books housed in an slip case

Deluxe Edition

Signed copies of township and bement grain housed together in a chipboard slipcase, along with two 8x10 silver gelatin prints of images not published in township

***


In township, the photographs of Raymond Meeks, Adrianna Ault, and Tim Carpenter consider the measure of a life, and of lives lived over time. Barren midwestern winter landscapes set the scene for a farm auction, in which the accumulated land and implements of many generations are valued and dispersed. But not disregarded: the community at large will carry on, tilling the same earth with the same tools. An ending becomes a beginning, as it must. Brad Zellar contributes the story “My brother” to this TIS books publication.

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